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The Write to End Violence Against Women Awards


The Write to End Violence Against Women and Girls (WEVAW) Awards recognise and reward journalists, writers, and content creators across the UK who raise awareness of gender inequality and Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG).

Submissions for our 2024 WEVAW Awards are open.

The media's reporting of VAWG can play a vital role in ending this violence by increasing our understanding of VAWG and gender inequality and challenging its place in our society.

Since our inaugural Awards in 2013, the WEVAW Awards have been dedicated to recognising exceptional writers and journalists who work to increase awareness about gender inequality and violence against women and girls (VAWG). For the second consecutive year in our partnership with the End Violence Against Women Coalition (EVAW), our awards have been open to writers and journalists UK-wide. Before 2022, our awards were exclusively open to writers and journalists in Scotland.

We hold the Write to End Violence Against Women Awards around the 16 Day of Action on Gender Based Violence

Wooden Spoon

As well as celebrating good articles on VAWG we have the Wooden Spoon Award. This is rewarded to a common practice within articles that reinforces attitudes that perpetuate VAWG. Previous Wooden Spoons have been awarded to dramatic headlines, 'Sex Game Gone Wrong' as a murder defense, and articles focusing on the impact of violence on the perpetrator rather than the woman.

Public Recognition Awards

Due to COVID-19, our annual Write to End Violence Against Women Awards did not take place in 2020 or 2021. Instead we invited the public to nominate articles, blogs, and other media content for the Write to End Violence Against Women Public Recognition Awards.

What makes a good article?

When choosing the pieces we think deserve recognition we look for a number of qualities.

1. How well written is the piece?

  • Is this a good piece of journalism?
  • Is the quality of the writing good?
  • Does it flow well? Is language well utilised?
  • Is it enjoyable to read?


2. Does this piece challenge gender inequality and/or violence against women?

Does the piece:

  • effectively raise awareness about gender equalityas an issue and challenge it?
  • Challenge or reinforce myths and stereotypes? e.g. implying the survivor is to blame; portraying perpetrators as beasts or fiends, or as misunderstood anti-heroes; describing violence as crimes of passion etc.
  • Use quotes from experts, facts, or figures to place the story in a wider context of VAWG?
  • Talk about the root cause of VAWG?
  • Include the voice or the impact of this violence on a victim-survivor?
  • Treat the victim-survivor of abuse or violence with respect for their experience, dignity, and safety?
  • Provide helplines at the end of the article?

 

3. Does this piece have a wow factor?

 

  • Is it innovative?
  • Is it original?
  • Does it contribute something new to the discourse?
  • Is it on an unusual topic, or does it shed new light on an old topic?
  • Does it give an interesting perspective to a story?
  • Is it from a voice you haven't heard before?
  • Is it from the perspective of an underrepresented group?
  • Does it make you think?

 

For more information on how writing may challenge VAWG see our media guidelines on VAWG.

 

 

 

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Related downloads

Media Guidelines on Violence Against Women and Girls for BroadcastMedia Guidelines on Violence Against Women and Girls for Broadcast Media Guidelines on reporting on men's violence against women and girls for broadcast journalism.

Zero Tolerance's Media Guidelines on Violence Against Women and Girls for PrintZero Tolerance's Media Guidelines on Violence Against Women and Girls for Print Zero Tolerance's media guidelines on violence against women and girls are for journalists, editors, and other media professionals.

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