Leave the website
 

Respect Education Resource

The RESPECT programme has been developed for both primary and secondary schools in Scotland.  Through a series of activities the programme seeks to develop the discussion with children and young people about the links between violence against women and wider gender equality issues.

What is the RESPECT programme?

The RESPECT programme has been developed for both primary and secondary schools in Scotland.  Through a series of activities the programme seeks to develop the discussion with children and young people about the links between violence against women and wider gender equality issues.  Supported by various research studies conducted throughout the UK, the programme is based on the principle that relationship education can create an environment where these issues can be discussed so that young people are able to source accurate information for themselves and learn to develop relationships based on equality and respect.  


Why do we need the RESPECT programme?

Prevention work carried out in schools across Scotland often explores issues such as how to develop healthy relationships or dealing with bullying.  While this is important work that needs to continue, we also need a focus on the root causes of violence against women – such as gender inequality. The lack of any analysis of the impact of gender inequality, sexual coercion and abuse in teenage relationships along with sexualised, and often sexually violent, messages in  everyday media can create a culture of acceptance of gender based violence and abuse. 


What does the RESPECT programme hope to achieve?

Specific aims are addressed in the individual lessons for both primary and secondary programmes but it is hoped that by engaging with RESPECT, we can –

  • Promote positive skills for relationships based on equality and respect.
  • Support equal rights for young men and women, boys and girls.
  • Provide accurate information about violence and abuse, and try to challenge prevalent misinformation, stereotypes and attitudes that contribute to the acceptability of violence.
  • Promote understanding of power relationships that provide the context in which abuse/victimisation occurs.
  • Promote the rights and responsibilities of children and young people as citizens.
  • Encourage confidence, self-respect and emotional literacy in young people in preparation for adulthood and parenthood.
  • Guide children and young people to support available to them.
AttachmentSize
What teachers need to know.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
269.62 KB
AttachmentSize
What teachers need to do.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
99.27 KB
AttachmentSize
Primary Activities.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
316.98 KB
AttachmentSize
Primary Lessons.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
344.19 KB
AttachmentSize
Secondary Activities.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
64.09 KB
AttachmentSize
Secondary Lessons.pdf
Added: February 4, 2015
401.23 KB
 
 

Twitter


Facebook

Latest News

Zero Tolerance launch ‘What journalists need to know about the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Bill’ with Cabinet Secretary Michael Matheson

MoreDecember 6, 2017

Shortlist Announced for Write to End Violence Against Women Awards 2017

MoreNovember 29, 2017

Latest Blog

The power of zero: how a bold Scotland-based campaign changed the world's thinking about sexual violence

MoreJuly 25, 2017

Taking Stalking Seriously

MoreJune 13, 2017